Sermons

God With Us

God With Us
Nov 2020 - Dec 2020
The characters of the Advent story are familiar. You have the unsuspecting shepherds who would be confronted with the announcement of the angels. There are the mysterious wisemen who came carrying gifts and seeking a king. You have the gracious step-father of Jesus, Joseph who cared for the woman he loved. Then there is Mary, who miraculously carried the son of God in her womb. All of these characters surround Jesus in our nativity scenes worshiping the Christ Child.

There is one group that does not make it into those scenes, but they lurk in the shadows of each retelling of the story. Without them the backdrop of the story is blank. They fill in the significance of this anticipated event. Who are these characters? The prophets foretold the coming of one that would come to rescue His people from slavery. They told of one that would come in the spirit of Moses as a deliverer. They told of one who would be the true son of David.

Sermons in this series

Love with Mary
Sun, Dec 20, 2020
And when they saw it, they made known the saying that had been told them concerning this child. And all who heard it wondered at what the shepherds told them. But Mary treasured up all these things, pondering them in her heart. -- Luke 2:17–19 (ESV) One of the dominating images of the Christmas story is a young woman deep into her pregnancy enduring the long uncomfortable journey to Bethlehem. Through the scriptures we see a woman not only with a maternal love for her child, but also a love for him as her savior. It is both amazing and beautiful. This week we take some time to examine that kind of love, but I want to look beyond Mary's love (as great as it is) to a love that is even wider and deeper. As you consider what love that might be, I'd encourage you to read 1 John 4 to prepare your heart to worship together.
Joy with the Angels
Sun, Dec 13, 2020
And an angel of the Lord appeared to them, and the glory of the Lord shone around them, and they were filled with great fear. And the angel said to them, “Fear not, for behold, I bring you good news of great joy that will be for all the people. For unto you is born this day in the city of David a Savior, who is Christ the Lord. -- Luke 2:9–11 (ESV) There are few things as exciting as the birth of a child. Most parents mark it down as one of the greatest memories of their life. We want to let people know. We post about it online. We send out announcements. We hold parties. It's a life-defining moment in so many ways. When that child is the offspring of someone important or famous, this excitement takes on another dimension. Even people outside of family and friends are celebrating and want to know the details. So it's not surprising that for one very special and unique child a grand, joyous announcement was made. It wasn't mailed out, but it was broadcast across the night sky to some unlikely shepherds and they could not wait to pass along the news to everyone they met. This week we examine the Joy of the Shepherds. Take a few minutes to read back through the very special birth announcement there. Consider why it was so joyous and what that joy propelled the shepherds to say and do.
God's Peace
Sun, Dec 06, 2020
And suddenly there was with the angel a multitude of the heavenly host praising God and saying, “Glory to God in the highest, and on earth peace among those with whom he is pleased!” When the angels went away from them into heaven, the shepherds said to one another, “Let us go over to Bethlehem and see this thing that has happened, which the Lord has made known to us.” -- Luke 2:13–15 (ESV) 'I Heard the Bells on Christmas Day' is a song adapted from a Henry Longfellow poem. The poem tells of Longfellow's struggles over the death of his wife and war injury of his son. As he sadly ponders those realities, the Christmas bells of the local church ring and remind him of the true peace found at Christmas. What is the source and basis of that peace? Is it just a ceasing of conflict? Is it just a reminder for us to get along with each other? This week we continue our celebration of Advent by considering these angels and the Peace they announce. We will celebrate together around the advent wreath and will sing of the One who is to come.
Hope of the Prophets
Sun, Nov 29, 2020
For to us a child is born, to us a son is given; and the government shall be upon his shoulder, and his name shall be called Wonderful Counselor, Mighty God, Everlasting Father, Prince of Peace. Of the increase of his government and of peace there will be no end, on the throne of David and over his kingdom, to establish it and to uphold it with justice and with righteousness from this time forth and forevermore. The zeal of the LORD of hosts will do this. -- Isaiah 9:6–7 (ESV) The characters of the Advent story are familiar. You have the unsuspecting shepherds who would be confronted with the annoucement of the angels. There are the mysterious wisemen who came carrying gifts and seeking a king. You have the gracious step-father of Jesus, Joseph who cared for the woman he loved. Then there is Mary, who miraculously carrieded the son of God in her womb. All of these characters surround Jesus in our nativity scenes worshiping the Christ Child. There is one group that does not make it into those scenes, but they lurk in the shadows of each retelling of the story. Without them the backdrop of the story is blank. They fill in the significance of this anticipated event. Who are these characters? The prophets foretold the coming of one that would come to rescue His people from slavery. They told of one that would come in the spirit of Moses as a deliverer. They told of one who would be the true son of David. This week we begin our celebration of Advent by considering these prophets and the hope they present of a coming deliverer.
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