Sermons

Andy Wulff

Andy Wulff
Role: Lead Pastor

I’m a pastor’s kid that survived moving from the Midwest to So Cal between Jr. High and High School. I made a profession of faith at age 5 but grew tremendously when several men invested in my life during my high school years. It was then I sensed God moving me toward ministry. In 1993, I married my high school sweetheart, Melissa. And since then God has given us 5 kids.

In 2005 God brought us to Huntsville. As transplants to the south, we quickly fell in love with the area and now call it home. In my spare time, which isn’t much with 5 kids, I enjoy woodworking and watching football.

You can contact me @ 256-830-5544 x11 or follow me on Facebook or Twitter

Latest sermons by this teacher

Joy's Little Secret - Contentment
Sun, Nov 15, 2020
I know how to be brought low, and I know how to abound. In any and every circumstance, I have learned the secret of facing plenty and hunger, abundance and need. I can do all things through him who strengthens me. - Philippians 4:12–13 (ESV) Some verses seem to get memorialized. They end up on plaques and mugs. They become phrases and mottos. Unfortunately, most of them get severed from their context which endangers their true meaning and interrupts their true power. One of those verses is Philippian 4:13. I like to call it the Kool-Aid man verse. Remember him. He was the big, giant picther with a face that would bust through walls to serve kids that red sugary goodness. Many people read Phil 4:13 and think they too can be the Kool-aid man, busting through walls both figuratively and actually with God's empowerment. (OH YEAH!) But is that what it means? As Paul closes out the letter, he pens a brief thank you. He calls on God's strengthening grace for a very specific need. It's a need that very relevant today and one that requires God's strengthening grace. Take a few minutes and read through Philippians 4 to discover it.
Living with Joy in Between - Part 2
Sun, Nov 01, 2020
But our citizenship is in heaven, and from it we await a Savior, the Lord Jesus Christ, who will transform our lowly body to be like his glorious body, by the power that enables him even to subject all things to himself - Philippians 3:20–21 (ESV) A few weeks ago we sent out the State of Theology survey. It was helpful to get a snapshot of our congregation's thoughts and understanding about what the Bible teaches. If you didn't see the results, take a look. There were several noteworthy things that we will talk about in time, but one highlighted our current moment in this country. Question 21 stated: Christians should be silent on issues of politics - true or false. A bit to my suprise the scale was tipped toward the 'false' answer. You asked (sort of), so I'm going to answer (sort of). This week we continue to look at Philippians 3. Paul is addressing what it looks like to live in between the cross and eternity. As he does that, he includes their politics. Take a few minutes to read through Philippians 3 to prepare your heart and mind to worship. Then plan to join us at 10AM either in person or online. I'm looking forward to it.
Living with Joy in Between - Part 1
Sun, Oct 25, 2020
I press on toward the goal for the prize of the upward call of God in Christ Jesus. Let those of us who are mature think this way, and if in anything you think otherwise, God will reveal that also to you. - Philippians 3:14–15 (ESV) The story of the Bible is the one grand story of our creation, fall, redemption, and glory. It is a story filled with unexpected turns. It reveals the dark depths of humanity and the glorious heights of God's character. It covers from the very beginning to the very end of everything. Often it is hard for us to locate our place in that story. We aren't sure where we are. We aren't sure what part we are to play. We see the grand movements of the past and we hope in the grand conclusions we await. We are left here in what feels at times like the doldrums of the redemptive storyline. This week Paul starts to wrap up the letter to the Philippians. While doing so he gives us instruction on how we should live with joy in the 'in-between'. These are important and relevant encouragements as we seek to run the race ahead. Will you take a few minutes before Sunday to read through Philippians 3. What is Paul pointing us toward? How does this state of 'in-between-ness' both motivate and challenge us to move forward?
The Joy Killer - Self-Righteousness
Sun, Oct 18, 2020
Finally, my brothers, rejoice in the Lord. To write the same things to you is no trouble to me and is safe for you. - Philippians 3:1 (ESV) When you consider fighting for joy there seems to be multiple things that collude to regularly defeat it. Circumstances collapse on us, squashing joy. Stress and anxiety assault us and joy seems to retreat in defeat. Busyness tells us we don't have time to think about joy. All of these must be addressed to find joy. Paul wants to consider something that will kill joy that we may not consider, and it seems that from his address in Philippians 3 it might be the chief enemy of joy. He confronts it boldly. He points us to a life-giving truth that fuels joy. Take a few minutes to read through the chapter. See if you see the dangerous joy killer and it's solution.
Sermon 10-4-2020
Sun, Oct 04, 2020
Therefore, my beloved, as you have always obeyed, so now, not only as in my presence but much more in my absence, work out your own salvation with fear and trembling, for it is God who works in you, both to will and to work for his good pleasure. - Philippians 2:12–13 (ESV) I'm thinking about starting a new program at Hope. I'm think of calling it the 'Tag-a-long' ministry. In this ministry, I'll come to your home and live with you for 72 hours. It won't be a teaching ministry. I'll just be around. I'll go with you to work and out on appointments. I'll just be there. Don't worry I won't get in the way. If I started the ministry by being with you, how would that change how you work? Or how would it change what happens in your home? How would it change your interactions with those in your life? We have a built-in tendency to act differently when we are being watched. We slow down when a cop drives by. Paul recognizes this idea. However, he wants to call the Philippians to a life of integrity and obedience if he is there or not. This week we continue to open up Philippians in chapter 2. Would you take a few mintues and read through the chapter to prepare your heart and mind to worship together?
The Joy of Humility - Part 2
Sun, Sep 27, 2020
Have this mind among yourselves, which is yours in Christ Jesus, who, though he was in the form of God, did not count equality with God a thing to be grasped, but emptied himself, by taking the form of a servant, being born in the likeness of men. And being found in human form, he humbled himself by becoming obedient to the point of death, even death on a cross. - Philippians 2:5–8 (ESV) Your true desires and character are often revealed in the pressure cooker of stressful situations. When the things you rely on get removed and the bare, raw realities of life are exposed, we simply have nowhere to run. It's in those moments that our selfishness is seen. Paul had lived in that state for many years. Imprisoned and awaiting a verdict that could mean release or death. In the midst of this, he found joy in humble service. Where did that orginate from? This week Paul points us to the center of the doctrine of Christ. His work and example provides not only the path but the power to live humbly in the middle of our strains and stresses. I want to encourage you to read and worship in Philippians 2 as we prepare to look at this passage. Many consider it an ancient hymn (that might even pre-date Paul). Take some time to slow down and soak it in. What is it telling us about Christ's nature, character, and work? And how does that help us to live beyond our selfish defaults?
The Joy of Humility - Part 1
Sun, Sep 20, 2020
complete my joy by being of the same mind, having the same love, being in full accord and of one mind. Do nothing from selfish ambition or conceit, but in humility count others more significant than yourselves. Let each of you look not only to his own interests, but also to the interests of others. - Philippians 2:2–4 (ESV) You deserve it. Treat yourself. You have to love yourself. Without self love you can't show others love. These are all phrases and ideas that show up around us. How we think of our self is important, but how should we think about ourselves? How does that effect how we think and ultimately treat those around us. This week we venture into Philippians chapter 2. In this chapter, Paul addresses one of his big concerns for this church - their unity in the middle of difficulty. How are they to respond to others that disagree or annoy them? How are they to love those that are hard to love? What gives them the motivation and power to do something that seem supernatural? I want to encourage you to take a few minutes to read through Philippians 2. Side-by-side in this chapter are practical commands and mountain top theology. As we unfold it, we will see how they are vitally connected.
Gospel Spreading Joy
Sun, Sep 06, 2020
I want you to know, brothers, that what has happened to me has really served to advance the gospel, so that it has become known throughout the whole imperial guard and to all the rest that my imprisonment is for Christ. - Philippians 1:12–13 (ESV) What feeling or emotion comes to mind when we start to talk about evangelism? I think for many people it's fear. We are afraid that we won't have the answer to a question. We are afraid of rejection. We are afraid of persecution. We are afraid our lives won't match what we say. There are a lot of fears, but what if one of the ways to discover joy was actually evangelism? This week we are going to explore Philippians 1:12-18. Paul's plans and programs for the advancement of the gospel didn't go as he planned. God had a different plan, a grander plan, a better plan. Watching that plan play out brought joy to the heart of Paul. Take some time to re-read Philippians 1 and see if you can hear the joy of his words over the clink of his chains.
Joy Filled Prayers - Part 2
Sun, Aug 30, 2020
And it is my prayer that your love may abound more and more, with knowledge and all discernment, so that you may approve what is excellent, and so be pure and blameless for the day of Christ, filled with the fruit of righteousness that comes through Jesus Christ, to the glory and praise of God. - Philippians 1:9–11 (ESV) Where did you find joy this week? Did you remember that God is not finished with you even when you feel like a failure? Did that bring you joy? This week we will look back at Philippians 1:3-11 to see what brought joy to Paul. We learned last week that Paul found joy in the Philippians partnership. He found joy in the truth that God's work is not finished in him or the Philippians. I want to encourage you to re-read Philippians 1 to prepare your heart and mind to worship together.
Joy Filled Prayers - Part 1
Sun, Aug 23, 2020
And I am sure of this, that he who began a good work in you will bring it to completion at the day of Jesus Christ. It is right for me to feel this way about you all, because I hold you in my heart, for you are all partakers with me of grace, both in my imprisonment and in the defense and confirmation of the gospel. - Philippians 1:6–7 (ESV) In the Chinese calendar each year is represented by an animal. If I was making the calendar for 2020, I think this years animal should be Eeyore. That's right, the sad donkey from the beloved children's story. I mean that's what 2020 feels like right? It has seemed like an endless string of horible circumstances that only worsen. (You have heard there is a double-hurricane sorta headed our way). So I'm calling it! 2020 is the year of the Eeyore. In the midst of all of this where can we find joy? I'm not talking about slapping on a smiling face and ignoring hard realities. I'm talking about real, true, honest joy. Joy that shines in the middle of gray. Joy that holds even when things get worse. Paul is going to help us discover that in Philippians. He is in chains and may be facing death. But he has joy. Where does it come from? And what is it's source? And what sustains it? This week be begin with Paul's opening prayer in Philippians 1:3-11. Will you take a few minutes and read through Philippians chapter 1? Ask yourself, what is driving his prayers? What is giving him hope?
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